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Jon Summers
Jon Summers
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Jon Summers
Steve on WECK Blog
The reaction to the piece I wrote the other day about my personal struggles with depression and anxiety has been overwhelming.
 
One aspect I didn't entirely think through-- was that when people would share their stories with me, I'd really like to be able to offer some kind of next step to help them, some kind of way forward with some resources to get get on the road to better mental health.
 
So I turned to the experts.
 
"I think what's important to remember is that everyone's definition of crisis is different," says Jessica Pirro with Crisis Services. She says it's important to know that whatever kind of crisis you feel, at whatever intensity, at whatever moment, Crisis Services wants to help. 
 
"Our hotline is available 24 hours a day for anyone that's in need," says Pirro. "You don't have to be in extreme crisis. You could just need some information and referrals to resources. Maybe you're interested in getting linked in with treatment or counseling. We can walk you through what that might look like."
 
Not just for when "it's really hitting the fan," Crisis Services also is for support to help prevent some future crisis.
 
They want to help getting you to the next step after the phone call, in whatever way makes you comfortable to get to that next step.
 
"People can call our hotline anonymously. A lot of people call us every day, just to talk about what's going on. Really our goal is to provide empathy. We're not here to judge anybody. We just want to provide some resources to help you through the situation you're faced with," says Pirro.
 
Anyone of any age who is experiencing a personal, emotional or mental health crisis can call 24 hours a day and find someone who just wants to help you make your way towards your next step to feeling better. 
 
Crisis Services' local hotline :716-834-3131
National Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255